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Raywood Ash - Fraxinus angustifolia var. Raywood
Family - Oleaceae
Also known as - Claret Ash, Narrow Leaved Ash

A commonly planted cultivar of the urban landscape in many countries where mature trees can grow to 12-15M (40-50ft) tall with a spread of 6-9M (20-30ft) into a full rounded canopy, however many will not make this size as the wood is quite brittle and can be prone to splitting at the branch nodes especially in the spring when the leaves emerge.  Palmate leaves of seven to eleven dark green glossy serrulate and lanceolate leaflets each 5-10cm (2-4in) long are pinnately opposite, the leaves turning an attractive burgundy to purple colour in the Autumn.

Raywood Ash was discovered as a seedling in a group of assorted Ash trees at a nursery in Australia in about 1910, and later grown nearby at Raywood a town in Northern Victoria, then introduced to Britain in 1928 and North America in the mid 1950's.

Ash Dieback Disease -
Raywood Ash also appears to suffer from a dieback disease caused by a fungal pathogen Botryosphaeria, however it is thought to not currently be in the UK.  The UK native Common Ash - Fraxinus excelsior is infected by a different fungal infection - Chalara fraxinea, now becoming a nationwide problem, it has also been found in Brickfields Park.

Raywood Ash - Fraxinus angustifolia var. Raywood, click for a larger image
Typical
Raywood Ash - Fraxinus angustifolia var. Raywood, click for a larger image
Newly emerged leaves
Raywood Ash - Fraxinus angustifolia var. Raywood, click for a larger image
Storm damage
Raywood Ash - Fraxinus angustifolia var. Raywood, click for a larger image
Damaged node
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